Monday, February 12, 2018

Some Evidence Canada's New Food Guide Will Care About Evidence

Though there's no white smoke signifying the publication of a new Food Guide billowing out of Health Canada's food directorate's chimney, there are some signs that when it's finally published, it may be evidence based.

Take for example this story.

It details the concerns of Conservative agriculture critic John Barlow and it contained some heartening quotes.

Here's my favourite,
"It is very clear…that Health Canada is going in a direction that is detrimental to our agriculture sector, detrimental to our food processors as well as our producers on the ground."
Now while I feel for any sector impacted by the future Guide's recommendations, that Health Canada is not actively capitulating to agricultural interests suggests that perhaps instead, it's sticking with science as its underpinning.

According to Barlow, his office has been flooded with concern from a broad range of agriculture groups who are nervous about Health Canada's new policy of not kowtowing to industry,
"I want to really stress this point. These letters are not only from the livestock industry or the dairy industry, there’s letters in here from grain growers, the horticulture associations — none of them want us as a government, in this food guide document, to be picking winners and losers. They all want to be successful."
While there may well be some disagreement among health professionals as to what truly constitutes a healthy diet, where there likely is no disagreement is the notion that the desires of various agricultural sectors to be "successful" doesn't factor in to dietary health at all.

And just as an odd aside, in the same article is a quote from Agriculture Minister Lawrence MacAulay who was asked to comment about agricultural concerns. His response?
"Without a question, what I want to see is Canadians make sure that they express their view on what’s presented and that’s why things are gazetted. My opinion — really, it’s Canadians opinion that really reflects what takes place on this and anything else that’s gazetted to make sure that is what they do want to have happen."
Here's hoping that's not how policy works in Canada, as while not bashing the public, I'm pretty sure Food Guides shouldn't be built on what Canadians' personal opinions about food happen to be.

So bring on the evidence, and for the matter, bring on the new Food Guide. Remind me again, why are we still waiting?

Bookmark and Share