Friday, February 09, 2007

? = 88.5 - (61.9 x age [y])+ PA x { (26.7 x weight [kg]) + (903 x height [m]) } + 20

So I was tipped off that buried in Health Canada's website, are in fact a few pages that do mention Calories.

The first page takes 4 clicks to get to from the Food Guide landing page and has a table of "average" Caloric needs that vary according to your age and sex.

Consistent with Health Canada, the table ignores the more important variables of height, weight and activity level on your Caloric requirements, despite the fact that presumably even Health Canada knows that the the taller, heavier or more active you are, the more calories you burn.

Linked from that first page is a resource that is reported to be there to help you

"calculate your individual estimated energy requirement us(ing) the formulas provided."
Sounds great, right?

Just what I've been asking for, right?

Then why am I posting this for Funny Friday?

Want to see what Health Canada thinks is helpful?

I'll tell you what, it's not an online Calorie calculator like the one I've pointed you folks to in the past (located here)

I've cut and pasted their helpful resource below.

Amazingly, even I'm shocked that they managed to do this so badly.

It's so bad that it's kind of funny in a horrifically sad, schadenfreude kind of way, it's like they're walking around stepping on rakes, which is why I'm co-labeling it for Funny Fridays.

So without further ado, here is what Health Canada has posted to help you calculate your individual Calorie needs.

Have a great weekend!

Equations to estimate energy requirement

Infants and young children

Estimated Energy Requirement (kcal/day) = Total Energy Expenditure + Energy Deposition

0-3 months
EER = (89 x weight [kg] –100) + 175
4-6 months EER = (89 x weight [kg] –100) + 56
7-12 months EER = (89 x weight [kg] –100) + 22
13-35 months EER = (89 x weight [kg] –100) + 20

Children and Adolescents 3-18 years


Estimated Energy Requirement (kcal/day) = Total Energy Expenditure + Energy Deposition

Boys
3-8 years [EER = 88.5 - (61.9 x age [y])+ PA x { (26.7 x weight [kg]) + (903 x height [m]) } + 20]
9-18 years [EER = 88.5 - (61.9 x age [y]) + PA x { (26.7 x weight [kg]) + (903 x height [m]) } + 25]

Girls
3-8 years [EER = 135.3 - (30.8 x age [y]) + PA x { (10.0 x weight [kg])+ (934 x height [m]) } + 20]
9-18 years [EER = 135.3 - (30.8 x age [y]) + PA x { (10.0 x weight [kg]) + (934 x height [m]) } + 25]

Adults 19 years and older


Estimated Energy Requirement (kcal/day) = Total Energy Expenditure

Men [EER = 662 - (9.53 x age [y]) + PA x { (15.91 x weight [kg]) + (539.6 x height [m]) }]
Women [EER = 354 - (6.91 x age [y]) + PA x { (9.36 x weight [kg]) + (726 x height [m]) }]

Pregnancy

Estimated Energy Requirement (kcal/day) = Non-pregnant EER + Pregnancy Energy Deposition

1 st trimester EER = Non-pregnant EER + 0
2 nd trimester EER = Non-pregnant EER + 340
3 rd trimester EER = Non-pregnant EER + 452

Lactation


Estimated Energy Requirement (kcal/day) = Non-pregnant EER + Milk Energy Output – Weight Loss

0-6 months postpartum EER = Non-pregnant EER + 500 – 170
7-12 months postpartum EER = Non-pregnant EER + 400 – 0

These equations provide an estimate of energy requirement. Relative body weight (i.e. loss, stable, gain) is the preferred indicator of energy adequacy.

Physical Activity Coefficients (PA values) for use in EER equations

Sedentary (PAL 1.0-1.39)Typical daily living activities (e.g., household tasks, walking to the bus)

Low Active (PAL 1.4-1.59)Typical daily living activities PLUS 30 - 60 minutes of daily moderate activity (ex. walking at 5-7 km/h)

Active(PAL 1.6-1.89)Typical daily living activities PLUS At least 60 minutes of daily moderate activity

Very Active (PAL 1.9-2.5)Typical daily living activities PLUS At least 60 minutes of daily moderate activity PLUS An additional 60 minutes of vigorous activity or 120 minutes of moderate activity

Bookmark and Share

6 comments:

  1. Hey boss,
    You said I need to be on 2000 Kcal to lose weight and be healthy, but Health Canada says I can have 3000. I am probably having an average of 2200-2400 Kcal per day and maintaining or losing slowly, so if I follow their recommendation, I would gain about 1-1.5 pounds per week all year! I used an activity coefficient of 1.5. which I may have underestimated.

    ReplyDelete
  2. traderprofit1:18 am

    I cannot link to the calorie calculator you have. In the past year I have dropped from 275 to 165 through diet, resistance training and cardio.
    Noe I have recently had a lower body lift. I have gained 30 lbs in 9 days (I overate 4415 calories only 1 day, rest were under 200, My point is that I see EER everywhere but the same data comes up with different results. I had my RMR tested by indirect calorimetry and came up with about 1650. I am wondering ehat I should add to this for a truly sedentary life for the past few weeks. I was eating about 2200-2300 calories and maintaining 165 with exercise, whih seems low relative with what EER calculates. When I am not laid up I either lift light weights with a trainer for 1.25 hrs and walk 3-4 miles, and on alternate days I jog/run 3 miles and walk 3.
    Seems I should burn more calories. I am 5' 11' , 165 presurgery (naked, morning. Also shouldn't surgivcal recovery offset some of the exercise I would normally do?
    I am limited to 1/2 mile walks till two weeks from surgery date.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anonymous8:01 am

    I assume you're complaining that this is so hard to use rather than that it's inaccurate, since it seems to be the same sort of formula behind most online calculators.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous2:10 pm

    What is so funny??

    Women [EER = 354 - (6.91 x age [y]) + PA x { (9.36 x weight [kg]) + (726 x height [m]) }]



    My estimated energy need is 1925 calories daily. For weight loss, you should substract approx. 500 cals.....
    I don't understand what the problem is here?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous7:17 am

    What is so funny is, that the more you weigh, the more calories you need...

    [EER = 354 - (6.91 x age [y]) + PA x { (9.36 x weight [kg]) + (726 x height [m]) }]

    so say you're 30 years old and 1.8m heigh and don't move around at all (giving you a PA of 1):
    354 - 6.91 x 30 + (9.36 x weight [kg]) + (726 x 1.8) = 1453.5 + (9.36 x weight [kg])
    So if you weigh 60kg, you "need" 2015 Kcal, if you weigh 180kg, you "need" 3138 Kcal.

    Cheers,
    I.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Anonymous12:31 pm

    @ Anon. (I.) -

    That's true, though. Bodies that weigh more take more energy to maintain. I guess it might seem ironic if you're coming from a certain perspective, but it is an inescapable fact.

    (Not sticking up for the formula here.)

    ReplyDelete